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dc.contributor.authorTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-16T09:07:32Z
dc.date.available2014-10-16T09:07:32Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationCTA. 2000. Beach almond, treasure of the islands. Spore 85. CTA, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
dc.identifier.issn1011-0054
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10568/46673
dc.descriptionThere is a tree with a great many uses that grows in the South Pacific called Terminalia catappa; it is more commonly known as the 'beach almond' or 'natapoa'. It reaches a height of between 25 and 40 metres, its deep roots help to protect beach shores and it resists high winds. Its hardwood timber is used in construction and furniture. Well suited to maritime climates, whether sub-tropical or tropical, it will grow in any coastal soil as long as it is well-drained. From its third year onwards, the 'natapoa' produces a dark-red fruit whose almond-like nuts are sold in local markets. There are several varieties of nuts, and they have been developed for a long time in Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands to increase fruit size, and to produce shells which are easier to break open. All in all, Terminalia catappa is a sturdy species, resistant to disease, and with its ease of reproduction and significant output, it could well be considered for cultivation elsewhere on tropical islands and coasts. South Pacific Regional Initiative on Forest Genetic Resources (SPRIG) Kuldeep Singh, Department of Forestry, Raiwaqua, Fiji Tolusina Pouli, Forestry Division, Apia, Samoa Basil Gua, Forestry Division, Honiara, Solomon Islands Tevita Faka osi, Viliami Manu, Department of Forestry, Nuku alofa, Tonga Ioan Viji, Department of Forestry, Port-Vila, Vanuatu Source: Pacific Islands Forests and Trees, June 1999
dc.description.abstractThere is a tree with a great many uses that grows in the South Pacific called Terminalia catappa; it is more commonly known as the 'beach almond' or 'natapoa'. It reaches a height of between 25 and 40 metres, its deep roots help to protect beach...
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCTA
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSpore, Spore 85
dc.sourceSpore
dc.titleBeach almond, treasure of the islands
dc.typeNews Item
cg.subject.ctaCROPS
cg.identifier.statusOpen Access
cg.contributor.affiliationTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
cg.fulltextstatusFormally Published
cg.identifier.urlhttp://spore.cta.int/images/stories/pdf/old/spore85.pdf
cg.placeWageningen, The Netherlands
cg.coverage.regionPACIFIC


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