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dc.contributor.authorTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-12T08:33:12Z
dc.date.available2015-03-12T08:33:12Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationCTA. 2008. Adding value to farm produce. Rural Radio Resource Pack 08/5. Wageningen, The Netherlands: CTA.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10568/57234
dc.descriptionAdding value to farm produce Cue: What have sunflowers, mushrooms, pineapples and sugarcane all got in common? Yes, they are all cash crops, but they are also crops that can benefit from value addition. For example, sunflower seeds can be used to make cooking oil. Pineapples and sugarcane can be used to make juice. Adding value can be an excellent way for farmers to earn more from their crops, especially when prices for raw commodities are very low. Pius Sawa sent this report. IN: ?I?m at the Uganda National Trade ? OUT: ? Yes, juice is ready.? DUR?N: 4?53? BACK ANNOUNCEMENT: Richard Eboru ending that report from Uganda?s National Trade Fair. The report was compiled by Pius Sawa and comes from a resource pack produced by CTA. Transcript Sawa I?m at the Uganda National Trade Fair here at UMA showground, trying to find out how smallscale farmers are trying to penetrate the market. Akol My names are Anna Grace Akol from Bukedea district. Sawa Are you a farmer? Akol Yes I am a farmer. We are growing sunflower. We started as 25 women, now we have moved to 1,000. We were growing, the market was not there, and we were fetching very little money. So we thought of value addition. So some good project came to our area and gave us ram presses, as women groups. We paid some money for the ram presses. So we started processing. After sometime the market for oil was mad and with the ram presses we could not manage them because they are manually operated. So now we have a motorised mill whereby we are growing our sunflower and processing it into cooking oil. And we are even getting a by-product called seedcake. That seedcake we are giving it to our members, half of it we are selling it. Then this one we give to members. They use it for rearing their chicken, and the waste from the chicken, we are telling our members we should put in our gardens where we have planted our citrus fruits. Sawa I?m here with the one of the farmers who is dealing in mushroom growing. Constantino I?m called Omuge Constantino. We grow mushrooms, then after growing the mushrooms we do what we call collective marketing. Sawa What type of mushroom are you dealing with? Constantino It is home grown mushroom, the oyster type of mushroom. We sell it both fresh mushrooms, then we also sell dry mushrooms. Sawa How do you add value to your mushrooms for you to access more market? Constantino What we do mainly now is we harvest the fresh mushroom, we dry it, then we pack it in kaveeras with our labels. Sawa Kaveeras are polythene bags. Constantino Yeah, polythene bags. Malunda I?m Mrs Malunda Violet from Kiyiinda Agro Food Enterprise. When I grow fruits then I process them. I add value, I pack them. Sawa What type of fruits are you growing? Malunda Pineapples, oranges, mangoes, grapes. From them we get wines, we get juices, we get passion fruit jam, we get appetisers, one with chilli without chilli. We pack a lot of things. We do them in season because you can?t do them at once a go. In a week we have to separate them. Some days we process wines, some days we process juices, some days we process appetisers. Sawa Here on the table I can see some are in bottles, some are in plastic containers and some are in paper bags. Of these kinds which ones are most expensive? Malunda Yeah, which are very expensive is those ones in the bottles because with the bottles, we don?t have a machine in Uganda giving us glass bottles. Sawa We don?t have a machine in Uganda producing glass bottles? Malunda No, it?s exported from outside which is very expensive. So we just collect bottles from Uganda which are already being used. We wash them, we sterilise them so that we can pack our products. So that?s a problem, even some of the materials are got from outside, sealing materials, seasonings. We processors are very many so sometimes you reach there to get the products when they are finished, so you have to wait until they will make another order. Sawa Now here I?m able to find one of the farmers who has come to this exhibition. Eboru I?m Richard Eboru. Sawa What are you doing here? Eboru I?m producing sugarcane juice. Sawa Can you tell me how do you do it? Eboru I first clean the sugarcane, then I roll it through the machine. We try to clean it before crushing out the juice. Sawa Ok, so I can see now the sugarcane is now clean. Now you are about to take it to the machine. Eboru This is a machine, it?s called a sugarcane crushing machine. It produces sugarcane juice. It has two motors which use power, yeah and some two stones for crushing the sugarcane which roll. Sawa So the sugarcane is going through the two stones. So you keep on rotating the process? Eboru Yeah, to squeeze out all the juice. Until the juice is squeezed out, that?s when I?ll throw this, when I no longer see any juice coming out. Sawa There?s a saucepan the other end which is just collecting the juice. Eboru Yeah, that where the juice goes. Sawa That?s wonderful. So now that one is through you have finished that one. Eboru Finished that one yeah. Sawa So is the juice ready for drinking? Eboru Yeah it is ready. Sawa Maybe a few times we are going to test it. So for example, one sugarcane can produce how much juice? Eboru A long sugarcane can make one and a half litres. Sawa Just one sugar cane? Eboru Yeah. Sawa And how long does it take to squeeze one sugarcane? Eboru Just like two minutes. Sawa Two minutes. So two minutes, you are ready to make about US$2 of juice. Eboru Yes, juice is ready. End of tracken_US
dc.description.abstractFour farmers at Uganda?s national trade fair describe how they add value to their farm produceen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCTAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRural Radio, Rural Radio Resource Pack 08/5en_US
dc.titleAdding value to farm produceen_US
dc.typeAudioen_US
cg.subject.ctaMARKETING AND TRADEen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen Accessen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
cg.placeWageningen, The Netherlandsen_US
cg.coverage.regionAFRICAen_US


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