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dc.contributor.authorHeve, William K
dc.contributor.authorOlesen, J.E.
dc.contributor.authorChirinda, Ngonidzashe
dc.contributor.authorAdiku, Samuel G.K.
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T16:30:42Z
dc.date.available2015-09-09T16:30:42Z
dc.date.issued2015-08
dc.identifier.citationHeve, William K.; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Chirinda, Ngonidzashe; Adiku, Samuel G.K.. 2015. Targeted management of organic resources for sustainably increasing soil organic carbon : Observations and perspectives for resource use and climate adaptations in northern Ghana. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B. Soil & Plant Science 13 p.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1651-1913
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10568/68104
dc.description.abstractSince soil organic matter (SOM) buffers against impacts of climatic variability, the objective of this study was to assess on-farm distribution of SOM and propose realistic options for increasing SOM and thus the adaptation of smallholder farmers to climate change and variability in the interior northern savannah of Ghana. Data and information on spatial distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC), current practices that could enhance climate adaptation including management of organic resources were collected through biophysical assessments and snap community surveys. Even though homestead fields were more frequently cultivated, higher amounts of SOC (15 ± 2 g kg−1) were observed in homesteads when compared to the periphery cropped sections in bushes (SOC = 9 ± 1 g kg−1). Possibly, a combination of household wastes, droppings of domestic animals that are mostly reared in a free-range system, manures applied to crops and cultural norms of chieftaincy, which cause short-term fallowing of homestead fields could account for the differences in SOC. Use of organic resources for soil amendment among farmers was low (31% of interviewed farmers) due largely to ignorance of fertilizer values of manures and residues, traditions for bush-burning and competing use of organic resources for fuels. Our findings suggest a need for effective management practices, training and awareness aimed at improving management of organic resources and, consequently, increasing SOC and resilience to climate-change-induced risks.
dc.format.extent13 p.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Groupen_US
dc.sourceActa Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B. Soil & Plant Scienceen_US
dc.subjectADAPTATIONen_US
dc.subjectCLIMATEen_US
dc.subjectCLIMATE CHANGEen_US
dc.subjectSOIL MANAGEMENTen_US
dc.subjectFERTILIZERSen_US
dc.subjectRESILIENCE TO SHOCKS AND CRISESen_US
dc.subjectSPATIAL DATABASEen_US
dc.subjectCARBONen_US
dc.subjectORGANIC FERTILIZERSen_US
dc.subjectADAPTACIÓNen_US
dc.subjectCLIMAen_US
dc.subjectCAMBIO CLIMÁTICOen_US
dc.subjectMANEJO DEL SUELOen_US
dc.subjectABONOSen_US
dc.subjectRESILIENCIA FRENTE A IMPACTOS Y CRISISen_US
dc.subjectBASE DE DATOS ESPACIALen_US
dc.subjectCARBONOen_US
dc.subjectABONOS ORGÁNICOSen_US
dc.titleTargeted management of organic resources for sustainably increasing soil organic carbon: Observations and perspectives for resource use and climate adaptations in northern Ghanaen_US
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.ciatCLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONen_US
cg.subject.ciatSOIL HEALTHen_US
cg.identifier.ccafsprojectFP3_CLIFF
cg.identifier.ccafsprojectFP3_SAMPLES
cg.identifier.statusLimited Accessen_US
cg.subject.ccafsLOW EMISSIONS DEVELOPMENT
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09064710.2015.1081396en_US
cg.isijournalISI Journal
cg.coverage.regionAFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.regionWEST AFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.countryGHANAen_US
cg.contributor.crpClimate Change, Agriculture and Food Security
cg.creator.idNgonidzashe Chirinda: 0000-0002-4213-6294


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