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dc.contributor.authorSnook, L.
dc.contributor.authorAlves, T.
dc.contributor.authorSousa, C.
dc.contributor.authorLoo, J.
dc.contributor.authorGratzer, G.
dc.contributor.authorDuguma, L.
dc.contributor.authorSchrotter, C.
dc.contributor.authorRibeiro, N.
dc.contributor.authorMahanzule, R.
dc.contributor.authorMazuze, F.
dc.contributor.authorCuco, E.
dc.contributor.authorElias, M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T13:47:04Z
dc.date.available2016-02-09T13:47:04Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationSnook, L.; Alves, T.; Sousa, C.; Loo, J.; Gratzer, G.; Duguma, L.; Schrotter, C.; Ribeiro, N.; Mahanzule, R.; Mazuze, F.; Cuco, E.; Elias, M. (2015) Relearning traditional knowledge to achieve sustainability: honey gathering in the miombo woodlands of northern Mozambique. In: XIV World Forestry Congress, Durban, South Africa, 7-11 September 2015. FAO.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10568/70968
dc.description.abstractMozambique’s Niassa Reserve contains Africa’s best preserved miombo woodlands. Half of the households there gather wild honey from natural hives for consumption and income. However, most collectors used destructive techniques: setting fire to the grasses under the hive tree to create smoke and then felling the tree. Cutting trees to obtain honey was the principal source of tree mortality. Trees grow very slowly, about 0.25 cm diameter [dbh]/yr, meaning an average hive tree was nearly 200 years old. Furthermore, of the trees > 20 cm dbh of species important for nectar and hives, only about 15% had cavities. Although fire is intrinsic to miombo woodlands, the increased frequency resulting from anthropogenic sources impedes regeneration of some tree species as well as affecting bees, other wildlife and villages. A few people in the reserve had learned from earlier generations how to gather honey in a nondestructive way, using certain plant species to keep bees from stinging and climbing the trees using ropes to take the honey combs out of the hives. Traditional practices included leaving the larval combs behind so the colony continued to grow. Previously, the older men who had this knowledge had not been willing to share it with younger men. The project arranged for one of the traditional honey hunters to participate in an international conference on honey collection with other indigenous collectors from around the world. This helped him recognize the value of his knowledge. The project team then arranged for him to demonstrate these traditional techniques to groups of honey hunters in nine communities within the Reserve. A yearlater, monitoring revealed that many collectors had adopted these nondestructive techniques. They found them less time consuming, and appreciated that they allowed collectors to return to the same trees repeatedly to obtain honey. Sharing traditional knowledge made honey hunting compatible with the conservation of miombo woodlands.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFAOen_US
dc.subjectFIRESen_US
dc.subjectAPIDAEen_US
dc.subjectINDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGEen_US
dc.subjectPROTECTED AREASen_US
dc.subjectSUSTAINABILITYen_US
dc.subjectNATURE CONSERVATIONen_US
dc.subjectHONEYen_US
dc.titleRelearning traditional knowledge to achieve sustainability: honey gathering in the miombo woodlands of northern Mozambiqueen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
cg.subject.bioversityFIRES
cg.subject.bioversityINDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE
cg.subject.bioversityPROTECTED AREAS
cg.subject.bioversitySUSTAINABILITY
cg.subject.bioversityNATURE CONSERVATION
cg.authorship.typesCGIAR and developing country instituteen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen Accessen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationBioversity Internationalen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austriaen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationInstituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambiqueen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorld Agroforestry Centreen_US
cg.targetaudienceSCIENTISTSen_US
cg.identifier.urlhttp://foris.fao.org/wfc2015/api/file/552e8b8e9e00c2f116f8eac2/contents/028c3429-30dd-4b71-856b-22ea44d4849c.pdfen_US
cg.coverage.countryMOZAMBIQUEen_US
cg.contributor.crpForests, Trees and Agroforestryen_US


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