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dc.contributor.authorWolfe, M.D.
dc.contributor.authorRabbi, Ismail Y
dc.contributor.authorEgesi, Chiedozie N.
dc.contributor.authorHamblin, M.
dc.contributor.authorKawuki, R.
dc.contributor.authorKulakow, P.A.
dc.contributor.authorLozano, R.
dc.contributor.authorCarpio, D.P. del
dc.contributor.authorRamu, P.
dc.contributor.authorJannink, J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T11:16:26Z
dc.date.available2016-06-23T11:16:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-15
dc.identifier.citationWolfe, M. D., Rabbi, I. Y., Egesi, C., Hamblin, M., Kawuki, R., Kulakow, P., ... & Jannink, J. L. (2016). Genome-Wide Association and Prediction Reveals Genetic Architecture of Cassava Mosaic Disease Resistance and Prospects for Rapid Genetic Improvement. The Plant Genome, 9(2), 1-13.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1940-3372
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10568/75810
dc.descriptionPublished: 13 May 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractCassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a crucial, under-researched crop feeding millions worldwide, especially in Africa. Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) has plagued production in Africa for over a century. Biparental mapping studies suggest primarily a single major gene mediates resistance. To investigate this genetic architecture, we conducted the first genome-wide association mapping study in cassava with up to 6128 genotyping-by-sequenced African breeding lines and 42,113 reference genome-mapped single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. We found a single region on chromosome 8 that accounts for 30 to 66% of genetic resistance in the African cassava germplasm. Thirteen additional regions with small effects were also identified. Further dissection of the major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 8 revealed the presence of two possibly epistatic loci and/or multiple resistance alleles, which may account for the difference between moderate and strong disease resistances in the germplasm. Search of potential candidate genes in the major QTL region identified two peroxidases and one thioredoxin. Finally, we found genomic prediction accuracy of 0.53 to 0.58 suggesting that genomic selection (GS) will be effective both for improving resistance in breeding populations and identifying highly resistant clones as varieties.en_US
dc.format.extent1-13en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.sourceThe Plant Genomeen_US
dc.subjectGENETIC GAINen_US
dc.subjectGERMPLASM COLLECTIONSen_US
dc.titleGenome-wide association and prediction reveals genetic architecture of cassava mosaic disease resistance and prospects for rapid genetic improvementen_US
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.authorship.typesCGIAR and developing country instituteen_US
cg.authorship.typesCGIAR and advanced research instituteen_US
cg.subject.iitaCASSAVAen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen Accessen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCornell Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationInternational Institute of Tropical Agricultureen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationNational Root Crops Research Institute, Nigeriaen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationNational Crops Resources Research Institute, Ugandaen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUnited States Department of Agricultureen_US
cg.targetaudienceSCIENTISTSen_US
cg.fulltextstatusFormally Publisheden_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.3835/plantgenome2015.11.0118en_US
cg.isijournalISI Journalen_US
cg.coverage.regionAFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.regionWEST AFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.countryNIGERIAen_US
cg.contributor.crpRoots, Tubers and Bananasen_US


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