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dc.contributor.authorLamanna, Christine
dc.contributor.authorNamoi, Nictor
dc.contributor.authorKimaro, Anthony A.
dc.contributor.authorMpanda, Mathew
dc.contributor.authorEgeru, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorOkia, Clement
dc.contributor.authorRamirez Villegas, Julian
dc.contributor.authorMwongera, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorAmpaire, Edidah L.
dc.contributor.authorAsten, Piet J.A. van
dc.contributor.authorWinowiecki, Leigh A.
dc.contributor.authorLäderach, Peter
dc.contributor.authorRosenstock, Todd S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-03T16:12:28Z
dc.date.available2016-10-03T16:12:28Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-03
dc.identifier.citationLamanna C, Namoi N, Kimaro A, Mpanda M, Egeru A, Okia C, Ramirez-Villegas J, Mwongera C, Ampaire E, van Asten P, Winowiecki L, Läderach P, Rosenstock TS. 2016. Evidence-based opportunities for out-scaling climate-smart agriculture in East Africa. CCAFS Working Paper no. 172. Copenhagen, Denmark: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10568/77180
dc.description.abstractClimate-smart agriculture (CSA) is being widely promoted as a solution for food insecurity and climate change adaptation in food systems of sub-Saharan Africa, while simultaneously reducing the rate of greenhouse gas emissions. Governments throughout Africa are writing policies and programs to promote CSA practices despite uncertainty about the ability for practices to meet the triple CSA objectives of CSA. We conducted a systematic review of 175 peer-reviewed and grey literature studies, to gauge the impact of over seventy potential CSA practices on CSA outcomes in Tanzania and Uganda. Using a total of 6,342 observations, we found that practice impacts were highly context (i.e. farming system and location) specific. Nevertheless, practice effect across CSA outcomes generally agreed in direction. While our results suggest that CSA is indeed possible, lack of mitigation data precludes a more conclusive statement. Furthermore, the inclusion of potential adoption rates changes the potential of CSA practices to achieve benefits at scale. Given the uncertainty and variable impacts of practices across regions and outcomes, it is critical for decision makers to prioritize practices based on their desired outcomes and local context.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCCAFS Working Paper;172
dc.subjectAGRICULTUREen_US
dc.subjectFOOD SECURITYen_US
dc.subjectCLIMATE CHANGEen_US
dc.subjectCLIMATE-SMART AGRICULTUREen_US
dc.subjectMAIZEen_US
dc.subjectADAPTATIONen_US
dc.subjectRESILIENCEen_US
dc.subjectDECISION MAKINGen_US
dc.titleEvidence-based opportunities for out-scaling climate-smart agriculture in East Africaen_US
dc.typeWorking Paper
cg.authorship.typesCGIAR and advanced research instituteen_US
cg.identifier.ccafsprojectFP4_PACCAen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen Accessen_US
cg.subject.ccafsPRIORITIES AND POLICIES FOR CSAen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorld Agroforestry Centreen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationMakerere Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationInternational Center for Tropical Agricultureen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationInternational Institute of Tropical Agricultureen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Securityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationSchool of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leedsen_US
cg.targetaudienceSCIENTISTSen_US
cg.coverage.regionAFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.regionEAST AFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.countryTANZANIAen_US
cg.coverage.countryUGANDAen_US
cg.contributor.crpClimate Change, Agriculture and Food Securityen_US


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