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dc.contributor.authorKermah, M.
dc.contributor.authorFranke, A.C.
dc.contributor.authorAdjei-Nsiah, S.
dc.contributor.authorAhiabor, B.D.K.
dc.contributor.authorAbaidoo, R.C.
dc.contributor.authorGiller, Ken E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-31T14:54:46Z
dc.date.available2017-08-31T14:54:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-11
dc.identifier.citationKermah, M., Franke, A.C., Adjei-Nsiah, S., Ahiabor, B.D., Abaidoo, R.C. & Giller, K.E. (2017). Maize-grain legume intercropping for enhanced resource use efficiency and crop productivity in the Guinea savanna of northern Ghana. Field Crops Research, 213, 38-50.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0378-4290
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10568/83304
dc.descriptionArticle purchaseden_US
dc.description.abstractSmallholder farmers in the Guinea savanna practise cereal-legume intercropping to mitigate risks of crop failure in mono-cropping. The productivity of cereal-legume intercrops could be influenced by the spatial arrangement of the intercrops and the soil fertility status. Knowledge on the effect of soil fertility status on intercrop productivity is generally lacking in the Guinea savanna despite the wide variability in soil fertility status in farmers’ fields, and the productivity of within-row spatial arrangement of intercrops relative to the distinct-row systems under on-farm conditions has not been studied in the region. We studied effects of maize-legume spatial intercropping patterns and soil fertility status on resource use efficiency, crop productivity and economic profitability under on-farm conditions in the Guinea savanna. Treatments consisted of maize-legume intercropped within-row, 1 row of maize alternated with one row of legume, 2 rows of maize alternated with 2 rows of legume, a sole maize crop and a sole legume crop. These were assessed in the southern Guinea savanna (SGS) and the northern Guinea savanna (NGS) of northern Ghana for two seasons using three fields differing in soil fertility in each agro-ecological zone. Each treatment received 25 kg P and 30 kg K ha−1 at sowing, while maize received 25 kg (intercrop) or 50 kg (sole) N ha−1 at 3 and 6 weeks after sowing. The experiment was conducted in a randomised complete block design with each block of treatments replicated four times per fertility level at each site. Better soil conditions and rainfall in the SGS resulted in 48, 38 and 9% more maize, soybean and groundnut grain yield, respectively produced than in the NGS, while 11% more cowpea grain yield was produced in the NGS. Sole crops of maize and legumes produced significantly more grain yield per unit area than the respective intercrops of maize and legumes. Land equivalent ratios (LERs) of all intercrop patterns were greater than unity indicating more efficient and productive use of environmental resources by intercrops. Sole legumes intercepted more radiation than sole maize, while the interception by intercrops was in between that of sole legumes and sole maize. The intercrop however converted the intercepted radiation more efficiently into grain yield than the sole crops. Economic returns were greater for intercrops than for either sole crop. The within-row intercrop pattern was the most productive and lucrative system. Larger grain yields in the SGS and in fertile fields led to greater economic returns. However, intercropping systems in poorly fertile fields and in the NGS recorded greater LERs (1.16–1.81) compared with fertile fields (1.07–1.54) and with the SGS. This suggests that intercropping is more beneficial in less fertile fields and in more marginal environments such as the NGS. Cowpea and groundnut performed better than soybean when intercropped with maize, though the larger absolute grain yields of soybean resulted in larger net benefits.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBill & Melinda Gates Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNetherlands Fellowship Programmeen_US
dc.format.extent38-50en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.sourceField Crops Researchen_US
dc.subjectSOIL FERTILITYen_US
dc.subjectMAIZEen_US
dc.subjectGRAIN LEGUMESen_US
dc.subjectINTERCROPPINGen_US
dc.subjectSMALLHOLDER FARMERSen_US
dc.subjectCEREAL-LEGUMEen_US
dc.subjectSPATIAL ARRANGEMENTen_US
dc.subjectRADIATION INTERCEPTIONen_US
dc.subjectLERen_US
dc.subjectNET BENEFITen_US
dc.subjectCROPPING SYSTEMSen_US
dc.titleMaize-grain legume intercropping for enhanced resource use efficiency and crop productivity in the Guinea savanna of northern Ghanaen_US
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.authorship.typesCGIAR and developing country instituteen_US
cg.subject.iitaCROP SYSTEMSen_US
cg.subject.iitaFARMING SYSTEMSen_US
cg.subject.iitaGRAIN LEGUMESen_US
cg.subject.iitaMAIZEen_US
cg.subject.iitaSMALLHOLDER FARMERSen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen Accessen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWageningen University and Research Centreen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of the Free Stateen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationInternational Institute of Tropical Agricultureen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCouncil for Scientific and Industrial Research, Ghanaen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationKwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technologyen_US
cg.targetaudienceSCIENTISTSen_US
cg.fulltextstatusFormally Publisheden_US
cg.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fcr.2017.07.008en_US
cg.isijournalISI Journalen_US
cg.coverage.regionAFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.regionWEST AFRICAen_US
cg.coverage.countryGHANAen_US


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